AFRIKA

Racism & Black in Brazil = The Beauty Queen Stripped for Being Too Black ! Did you know Brazil was the Last Country on Earth to Abolish Slavery

Between the 16th and 19th centuries Brazil was at the center of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, bringing nearly four times as many slaves to the country as were brought to the United States. Today, mixed race and Afro-Brazilians comprise 51 per cent of the population.
On the face of it Brazil looks like a melting pot: half of the population is either African-Brazilian or mixed-race. But is its reputation of a “racial democracy” a mirage? Black Brazilians earn significantly less money than their white counterparts, go to school less, and make up a larger share of the prison population. As Brazil progresses in many areas, is racial inequality simmering beneath the surface?

Between the 16th and 19th centuries Brazil was at the center of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, bringing nearly four times as many slaves to the country as were brought to the United States. Today, mixed race and Afro-Brazilians comprise 51 per cent of the population.

tweets and retweets 

nayara

 

NAYARA STORY - BEAUTY QUEEN STRIPPED FOR BEING TOO BLACK 

Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival is well-known for being a huge cultural celebration that draws in millions of Brazilians and tourists alike, all of whom hope to bask in the exuberance of the massive event. Each year Brazil’s biggest television network, Globo, selects a Globeleza carnival queen, who is picked from obscurity and hyper-sexualized to become the star of the entire carnival. In 2013, Nayara Justino, a black Brazilian, was voted by the public to reign as the Globeleza, only to later be dethroned and replaced by a woman with much lighter skin for unknown reasons.

Now, in a new documentary from The Guardian, the 27-year-old is sharing that she thinks she was dismissed as Globeleza for being “too black”.

Since 1993, the Globeleza has usually been a woman with fair skin and of mixed Afro-descendants. The winner often becomes a household name, appearing in videos and photos. Justino says in the documentary that she grew up hoping that one day, she too, would hold the title.

“Brazilian TV’s carnival queen has always been light-skinned. But that didn’t stop me from applying when Globo held the first public competition to find a new carnival queen in 2013,” Justino says in the documentary. But her eventual win was short-lived once videos and photos of her as the new Globeleza went public.

“Lots of people were talking about the color of her skin because she was black and there had never been a black Globeleza before,” Rayla Souza, a friend of Justino, says in the documentary.

“People came on my Facebook page, calling me ‘monkey’ and ‘darkie,’” Justino says. There was a tremendous backlash from both white and black Brazilians.

“It was the racism that hurt me most of all. And the racism wasn’t just from white people, it came from black people, too,” Justino says of the negative commentary she received.

A few days after the public’s harsh reaction, she says that she was thanked by Globo for her contribution and terminated from the role. Soon after, she was replaced without a public vote by a light-skinned woman.

Globo gave a response to The Guardian in regards to its termination of Justino’s contract:

Globo does not base its contracts on skin colour. Actors are chosen according to their artistic fitness for the role. The same criteria applies to the choice of Globeleza, where artistic merit prevails.
“I hope to inspire young black girls,” Justino told The Huffington Post in regards to why she wanted to do the documentary and the message she hopes to give other young women who watch it. “Never give up.”

Justino told HuffPost that as far as the state of race relations today in Brazil goes, “We’ve still got a long way ahead.”

retwtr.com

Divisions in race and class shape the socioeconomic status of both indigenous and Afro-Brazilians, a situation that many argue is often denied or disguised. Sixty-three per cent of Brazil’s poor are black and Afro-Brazilians represent 65 per cent of homicide victims.
Follow
Daniel Fernandes @AltinhoRJ
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream from our own colonial past. It is engraved in our society. It is a system of exclusion. The poorest of society are mostly black.
4:17 AM - Jan 22, 2015
22 Replies Retweets 33 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Follow
nicole froio @NicoleFroio
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream Brazil is one of the most racist countries in the world. We hide behind miscegenation, but we are deeply segregated.
1:00 PM - Jan 22, 2015
Replies 22 Retweets 44 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Police violence is an ongoing problem in major cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. On average, Brazilian police kill six people per day, the majority of which are black. Afro-Brazilian women are victims of more than 60 per cent of female homicides by police.
@radiopockpuro: We don’t have racism in Brazil. We have the Pantone scale.
Image translation: Demonstrator...vandal
View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter
Follow
RadiσRσckPυrσ @RadioRockPuro
O Brasil não tem racismo.
Tem escala Pantone
2:08 AM - Jan 10, 2015
33 Replies 3434 Retweets 4040 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
In addition, many argue black women are frequently hypersexualized and fetishised in the media. A Brazilian adaptation of the popular US show 'Sex and the City' resulted in campaigns to get the programme cancelled for its racist clichés.
Follow
Renan Vieira @rnnvieira
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream sure! We have a big black population aside of Brazilian advertisement, for example. We don't see black people on TV commercials.
10:32 PM - Jan 21, 2015 · Sao Paulo, Brazil
11 Reply Retweets 44 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Follow
Victoria Cerqueira @vickycerqueira
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream security guards follow us in stores, police pull us over more often, total absence of black ppl on tv, magazines and ads.
9:40 PM - Jan 21, 2015
Replies Retweets 22 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Brazil’s Globo TV has been criticised for replacing Nayara Justino, their ‘Globeleza’ (Carnivalgirl), with a lighter skinned woman, Erika Moura. Nayara often faced racism online and comments that implied she was ‘too black’.
Below, an image of Moura (left) and Justino (right):


WP·3 YEARS AGO
Efforts have been made to help integrate Afro-Brazilians, including a 2012 law which requirespublic universities to set aside half of their spots for black students. Quotas such as these have existed for nearly a decade, but many say racism still thrives in universities and quotas are not enough:
Follow
Farhan Zaki @FarhanZakiKhan
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream quota for the backward areas do help but are against merit. Instead of quota, development should be done on those areas.
10:11 AM - Jan 22, 2015
11 Reply Retweets likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
@IsaahLessi: The major racism that exists in Brazil is the system of quotas. Ridiculous!
Follow
Isabella Lessi @IsaahLessi
Maior racismo que existe no Brasil é esse sistema de cotas. Ridículo!
4:14 PM - Jan 19, 2015
22 Replies 33 Retweets 55 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Many in the Stream community shared their views on racism in Brazil, some arguing it is a major problem:
Follow
Rafael Ferraresso @raferraresso
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream Our racial inequality is so raging that even discussing racism in Brazil is a taboo.
4:02 PM - Jan 22, 2015 · Poá, Brasil
11 Reply Retweets 11 like
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Follow
natasha ✔@NatashaVianna
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream Anti-blackness thrives in Brasil. Look at who was killed & displaced for World Cup stadiums & hotels - black and indigenous people
1:26 PM - Jan 22, 2015Divisions in race and class shape the socioeconomic status of both indigenous and Afro-Brazilians, a situation that many argue is often denied or disguised. Sixty-three per cent of Brazil’s poor are black and Afro-Brazilians represent 65 per cent of homicide victims.
Follow
Daniel Fernandes @AltinhoRJ
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream from our own colonial past. It is engraved in our society. It is a system of exclusion. The poorest of society are mostly black.
4:17 AM - Jan 22, 2015
2 2 Replies Retweets 3 3 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Follow
nicole froio @NicoleFroio
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream Brazil is one of the most racist countries in the world. We hide behind miscegenation, but we are deeply segregated.
1:00 PM - Jan 22, 2015
Replies 2 2 Retweets 4 4 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Police violence is an ongoing problem in major cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. On average, Brazilian police kill six people per day, the majority of which are black. Afro-Brazilian women are victims of more than 60 per cent of female homicides by police.
@radiopockpuro: We don’t have racism in Brazil. We have the Pantone scale.
Image translation: Demonstrator...vandal
View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter
Follow
RadiσRσckPυrσ @RadioRockPuro
O Brasil não tem racismo.
Tem escala Pantone
2:08 AM - Jan 10, 2015
3 3 Replies 34 34 Retweets 40 40 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
In addition, many argue black women are frequently hypersexualized and fetishised in the media. A Brazilian adaptation of the popular US show 'Sex and the City' resulted in campaigns to get the programme cancelled for its racist clichés.
Follow
Renan Vieira @rnnvieira
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream sure! We have a big black population aside of Brazilian advertisement, for example. We don't see black people on TV commercials.
10:32 PM - Jan 21, 2015 · Sao Paulo, Brazil
1 1 Reply Retweets 4 4 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Follow
Victoria Cerqueira @vickycerqueira
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream security guards follow us in stores, police pull us over more often, total absence of black ppl on tv, magazines and ads.
9:40 PM - Jan 21, 2015
Replies Retweets 2 2 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Brazil’s Globo TV has been criticised for replacing Nayara Justino, their ‘Globeleza’ (Carnival girl), with a lighter skinned woman, Erika Moura. Nayara often faced racism online and comments that implied she was ‘too black’.
Below, an image of Moura (left) and Justino (right):


Efforts have been made to help integrate Afro-Brazilians, including a 2012 law which requires public universities to set aside half of their spots for black students. Quotas such as these have existed for nearly a decade, but many say racism still thrives in universities and quotas are not enough:
Follow
Farhan Zaki @FarhanZakiKhan
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream quota for the backward areas do help but are against merit. Instead of quota, development should be done on those areas.
10:11 AM - Jan 22, 2015
1 1 Reply Retweets likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
@IsaahLessi: The major racism that exists in Brazil is the system of quotas. Ridiculous!
Follow
Isabella Lessi @IsaahLessi
Maior racismo que existe no Brasil é esse sistema de cotas. Ridículo!
4:14 PM - Jan 19, 2015
2 2 Replies 3 3 Retweets 5 5 likes
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Many in the Stream community shared their views on racism in Brazil, some arguing it is a major problem:
Follow
Rafael Ferraresso @raferraresso
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream Our racial inequality is so raging that even discussing racism in Brazil is a taboo.
4:02 PM - Jan 22, 2015 · Poá, Brasil
1 1 Reply Retweets 1 1 like
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Follow
natasha ✔ @NatashaVianna
Replying to @AJStream
@AJStream Anti-blackness thrives in Brasil. Look at who was killed & displaced for World Cup stadiums & hotels - black and indigenous people
1:26 PM - Jan 22, 2015

 

 

FEEDBURNER BUZZBOOST